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I leave Tuesday for an artist residency at Hambidge Creative Residency Program in North Georgia. A residency is applied for and awarded. For two weeks I will write and paint without distraction due to lack of internet or cell service. I’ll write about my paintings/cards and work on my new body of paintings (to be revealed after my trip.)

I will have my own house and studio, and will join up in the evenings for supper with the 9 other residents from different artistic disciplines. I’ve heard from other artists that the place looks like paradise. I’ll be sure and take lots of photos.

The following information is copied from their website:

The Center was created in 1934 by Mary Hambidge, who established the artist enclave and sustainable farm in memory of her artist partner, Jay Hambidge (1867–1924). After a brief career as a performer on vaudeville stages (Mary was a world-class whistler who appeared with her pet mockingbird Jimmy), she discovered weaving and eventually found her home among Appalachian weavers in the North Georgia mountains.

In the early days of Hambidge, she employed local women to create exceptional weavings that would one day be featured in many exhibits including the Smithsonian and MOMA. Later she broadened the scope of the Center by inviting artists for extended stays. After her death in 1973, the Center evolved into a formal and competitive residency program open to creative individuals from all walks of life.

Hambidge encourages applications from creative minds representing the widest possible range of perspectives and demographics. Visual artists, writers, poets, scientists, ceramicists, musicians, choreographers, chefs and beyond.

Nestled on 600 pristine acres in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Georgia, the Hambidge Center is a natural sanctuary for reflection and creativity. The property includes 7 miles of hiking trails among an incredible biodiversity of meadows, streams, waterfalls, native plants and wildflowers, and a cove forest. Its salamander population includes rare species that survive in only few parts of the world.